Airspace infringement maps

We have plotted every Airspace Infringement in controlled or restricted airspaces between 1 January 2021 and 30 April 2022 based on available data. See maps below. Users may filter through airspaces by clicking on the stack of tiles in the upper right-hand corner of each map and selecting or de-selecting layers. Airspaces are sorted by their upper airspace flight level (‘upper FL’).

Infringements associated with drones (RPAS) are excluded.

For most infringements, we have identified an infringed airspace and infringing flight. We marked these infringements with a red circle at the point the flight entered the infringed airspace – and we have plotted the flight’s trajectory for as long as it was in the infringed airspace. Hovering over an area will reveal an airspace’s name, and hovering over a trajectory or an entry point will reveal the timestamp and infringed airspace associated with an Airspace Infringement.

Controlled airspaces

  • Map 1 shows every Airspace Infringement in controlled airspace. Infringements with insufficient data are presented with blue circles.
  • Map 2 shows every controlled Airspace Infringements in which the infringing aircraft moved laterally into the airspace volume.
  • Map 3 shows every controlled Airspace Infringement in which the infringing aircraft moved vertically into the airspace volume.

 Restricted airspaces

  • Map 4 shows every Airspace Infringement in restricted airspace. Infringements with insufficient data are presented with blue circles.
  • Map 5 shows every restricted Airspace Infringement in which the infringing aircraft moved laterally into the airspace volume.
  • Map 6 shows every restricted Airspace Infringement in which the infringing aircraft moved vertically into the airspace volume.

Data limitations

Though we have tried to plot each Airspace Infringement, sometimes we specify the incorrect infringing airspace and/or infringing flight. This may be due to one or more of four limitations:

  1. AI geographic locations may be incorrect due to imprecision in reporting.
  2. AI flight levels may be incomplete due to imprecision in reporting.
  3. AI occurrence timestamps may be estimated.
  4. Airspace flight level restrictions may be associated with different hours of the day – or may be imposed at the discretion of air traffic management. Our analysis treats these restrictions as static.

Though we canvas a wide area – and a range of times – around each infringement in order to find the likeliest candidates, we may nonetheless focus on the incorrect airspace volume and/or flight.

Airspace infringement hotspots

Generally, airspace infringements do not occur at random locations. They frequently occur in the same areas and these are known as ‘hot spots’.

Sometimes these ‘hot spots’ are in critical locations, where an airspace infringement can interfere with the processing of traffic in controlled airspace.

Below are links to diagrams that show the location of the airspace infringement hot spots in the major basins. These hot spot diagrams also provide advice on what you can do to avoid having an airspace infringement in these locations.

The Department of Defence has provided the following diagrams showing the location of airspace infringement hot spots and tips on avoiding them.