Airservices is Australia's air navigation service provider - we provide air traffic control, aviation rescue and fire fighting and air navigation services.

2019 Changes

Adelaide Airport - Flight Path Change

10 July 2019

Changes to approach procedures at Adelaide Airport’s secondary runway (Runway 12/30)

When will this change occur?

Airservices will be implementing changes to some approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Adelaide Airport’s secondary runway (Runway 12/30) from 12 September 2019.

Changes to approach procedures at Adelaide Airport’s secondary runway

18 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices will make changes to some approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Adelaide Airport’s secondary runway from July 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires minor changes to existing arrival procedures at Adelaide Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures for aircraft arriving at Adelaide Airport (April 2019) under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For Queries regarding information on the change please contact Community Engagement

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)

interpreter-symbol-2

 

Resources

Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures for aircraft arriving at Adelaide Airport (April 2019)

Brisbane Airport - Airspace Change for Medical Helicopters

4 April 2019

What do we want to change?

Medical helicopters often transport patients to and from hospitals in central Brisbane, including Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Mater Hospital and Queensland Children’s Hospital.

Currently these helicopters have to ask for clearance from Brisbane Air Traffic Control, which can lead to delays.

This is because the helicopters are operating in controlled airspace meaning they have to share it with other aircraft who are also receiving instructions from Air Traffic Control.

We want to change an area of airspace between these hospitals to be uncontrolled airspace, meaning aircraft do not need clearance from Air Traffic Control to use it.

This change will make it easier and quicker for medical helicopters to get to and from these hospitals.

The changes will commence in November 2019.

What will this mean for the community?

The Brisbane Airspace Change for Medical Helicopters Fact Sheet provides more information about what is going to change.

Where can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)

General feedback can be provided:

Via online form at: https://feedback.emsbk.com/asa

Mail to: Feedback c/o Noise Complaints and Information Service, PO BOX 211 Mascot NSW 1460

Resources

Fact Sheet – Brisbane Airspace Change for Medical Helicopters (April 2019)

Coffs Harbour - Changes to Approach Procedures

8 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices will make changes to approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Coffs Harbour Airport from 18 July 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires a number of minor changes to existing arrival procedures at Coffs Harbour Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Coffs Harbour Approach Procedures Changes under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)

interpreter-symbol-2

General feedback can be provided:

Resources

Fact Sheet – Coffs Harbour Approach Procedures Changes (April 2019)

Coondewanna Airport - Airspace Change

Proposed amendment to approach procedure at Coondewanna Airport

18 April 2019

Airservices conducted community consultation on the Coondewanna Airport Proposed Airspace Change from 20 February 2019 – 3 April 2019.

No community feedback was received on the proposal.

The proposal will proceed to implementation in June 2019.

For more information please see the Coondewanna Airport – Proposed Amendment to Approach Procedure at Runway 08 Fact Sheet  under Downloads


20 February 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices is proposing to implement an amendment to the approach procedure at Runway 08 at Coondewanna Airport from June 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

The proposed change was identified during a cyclical three year review of approach procedures at the airport, and will provide a stabilised approach and allow for more accurate visual approaches.

What is going to change?

The amendment is a reduction in altitude of 110 feet (from 3440 feet to 3330 feet) within 6 – 10 kilometres from the runway threshold. Aircraft may be observed to be tracking slightly lower along this segment as a result of the amendment.

For more information please see the Coondewanna Airport – Proposed Amendment to Approach Procedure at Runway 08 Fact Sheet (February 2019) under Resources.

How can I have my say?

To provide feedback and/or to register to receive information on flight path changes, please contact Airservices Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) via:

  • Online form at: https://feedback.emsbk.com/asa
  • Mail to Feedback c/o Noise Complaints and Information Service, PO BOX 211 Mascot NSW 1460
  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
    interpreter-symbol-2

Feedback closes on 3 April 2019.

Resources

Coondewanna Airport – P0roposed Amendment to Approach Procedure at Runway 08 Fact Sheet (February 2019)

Devonport Airport - Changes to Approach Procedures

Proposed changes to approach procedures at Devonport Airport

7 January 2019

Feedback closed on 30 May 2019. Airservices considered the feedback from the community and the change proceeded to implementation in late 2019.

For a summary of the activities undertaken for this change please see Devonport Summary of Feedback – June 2019 under resources.


Proposed changes to approach procedures at Devonport Airport

18 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices is proposing changes to approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Devonport Airport from August 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires a number of changes to existing arrival procedures at Devonport Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures at Devonport Airport (April 2019) under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
    interpreter-symbol-2

Feedback can be provided:

Feedback closes on 30 May 2019.

Resources

Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures at Devonport Airport (April 2019)
Devonport Summary of Feedback – June 2019

Flinders Island Airport - Changes to Approach Procedures

Airservices implemented these changes in August 2019.


Changes to approach procedures at Flinders Island Airport

30 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices will make changes to some approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Flinders Island Airport from August 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires minor changes to existing arrival procedures at Flinders Island Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Flinders Island Approach Procedures Change (April 2019) under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
  • interpreter-symbol-2

General feedback can be provided:

Resources

Fact Sheet – Flinders Island Approach Procedures Change (April 2019)

Gold Coast Airport - Changes to High Altitude Routes

Changes to high altitude routes for jets arriving from the west and northwest

5 April 2019

Airservices conducted community consultation on the proposed changes to high altitude routes for jets arriving from the west and northwest from 5 February 2019 – 19 March 2019.

Airservices received one submission about the proposal. The submission was not supportive of the proposal and suggested that it would lead to concentrated noise.

Due to limited feedback and no alternative suggestions for flight path design, the change will proceed to implementation on 15 August 2019.


5 February 2019

When will this change occur?

  • Airservices proposes to implement changes to high altitude routes for jets arriving from the west and northwest to Gold Coast Airport from April 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

  • The proposed changes will create predictable traffic flow for aircraft using these routes and will improve safety by reducing workload for pilots and air traffic controllers.

What is going to change?

  • Currently jet aircraft arriving at high altitudes (8,000 – 20,000 feet) from the west and northwest into the Gold Coast are not required to flight plan along specific routes.
  • The proposed change will specify that jet aircraft fly set routes, using existing waypoints.
  • The proposed change may result in increased concentration of traffic, due to jet aircraft following the prescribed routes, but this will not lead to an overall increase in the number of aircraft movements.
  • There will be no change to aircraft altitudes or aircraft types as a result of the proposed changes.

Operations at Gold Coast Airport are restricted by a curfew between 11pm and 6am Queensland time, aircraft will not be flying these routes during the curfew hours.

For more information please see the Gold Coast Airport High Altitude Route Changes Fact Sheet (February 2019) under Resources.

 How can I have my say?

Feedback can be provided:

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
    interpreter-symbol-2

Feedback closes on 19 March 2019.

Resources

Gold Coast Airport High Altitude Route Changes Fact Sheet (February 2019)

Gold Coast Airport - Temporary Noise Monitors

23 October 2019

A Summary of Feedback for the community consultation on the Gold Coast Temporary Noise Monitors for the Instrument Landing System (ILS) Post Implementation Review (PIR) is now available on Airservices Engage Airservices Temporary Noise Monitor project page.

The Summary also includes the preferred zone for the installation of the second Temporary Noise Monitor, which will be installed north of Miami to provide information to the community on ILS operations in the vectoring and early approach area.

The Temporary Noise Monitors will be installed on 28 October 2019.

2 October 2019

Consultation on the Gold Coast Temporary Noise Monitors has now closed.

A Summary of Feedback will be available shortly on the Engage Airservices site. We will also provide confirmation of which zone was determined for placement of the Temporary Noise Monitors, and how to access data from the noise monitors.

We would like to thank interested community members who downloaded and viewed information through the Engage Airservices site.

 

17 September 2019

In February 2019, Airservices implemented the Instrument Landing System (ILS) at the Gold Coast.

Advice received from the then Minister for Transport and the Department of Environment in 2015 recommended that Airservices undertake a Post Implementation Review (PIR) of the Environmental Assessment of the Gold Coast Airport ILS, within 12-18 months of implementation.

This advice stated that noise monitoring of 3 months would be adequate to collect sufficient data to support the PIR, including verifying predicted noise levels, identifying non-compliances and informing corrective actions.

We will be undertaking a PIR for the Gold Coast ILS and will implement a temporary noise monitor in the Miami area (underneath the ILS flight path) to support the PIR. Additionally, we are proposing a second temporary noise monitor which will provide information from the ILS vectoring corridor/early approach area further north, where aircraft will be in the early stages of the ILS approach.

The second temporary noise monitor will be used to provide additional information to the community on ILS operations in the vectoring corridor/early approach area.

Due to the variable position of overflights in this area, it is unlikely that noise monitoring in this area will be utilised to validate noise levels.

Feedback

We are seeking feedback from community members with local knowledge of potential sources of noise to be considered by Airservices in determining the location of the additional Temporary Noise Monitor in the ILS vectoring and early approach area.

Feedback and information from local community members will supplement the technical data that we traditionally use to inform placement of noise monitors and closes 1 October 2019.

Please visit Engage Airservices to access:

  • an interactive map of the proposed zones
  • Fact Sheet; and
  • Frequently asked Questions

Information on the ‘Engage Airservices’ platform can be accessed without registering, however if you would like to submit feedback or comment on the interactive map,  you will need to register.

More information about the registration process is available at https://engage.airservicesaustralia.com/whyregister and our guide for using the ‘Engage Airservices’ platform.

Instrument landing system for Gold Coast Airport

4 February 2019

Following flight path validation completed in December 2018, the Instrument Landing System (ILS) will be operational at Gold Coast Airport from 28 February 2019.

An overview of the ILS can be found in the updated Fact sheet: Instrument landing system for Gold Coast Airport (February 2019).

Airservices has released an updated Fact Sheet: Noise Abatement Procedures for Gold Coast Airport (February 2019). Noise Abatement Procedures will ensure that alternative flight paths are used in preference to the ILS.   The Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) conditions required Airservices to design Noise Abatement Procedures (NAPs) to minimise the use of the ILS to situations where poor weather conditions affect visibility, for operational requirements, and during emergencies.

22 November 2018

Aircraft are expected to start using the ILS in early 2019. Before it is available to airlines the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) requires that the ILS is flight inspected and that the flight path is validated by a specialist calibration aircraft. The flight inspections occurred between 16-18 November and flight path validation is scheduled to occur on 4 December 2018.

Airservices has released a new fact sheet on Noise Abatement Procedures. Noise Abatement Procedures will ensure that alternative flight paths are used in preference to the ILS, unless operationally required due to weather or other reasons.

When in use, the new ILS flight paths will have a varying effect on suburbs to the north of the airport. A detailed overview can be found in the updated Fact sheet: Instrument landing system for Gold Coast Airport November 2018.

Previous Updates

October 2017

At Gold Coast Airport, an Instrument Landing System (ILS) will provide vertical and horizontal guidance to pilots when landing in low visibility weather conditions, reducing flight delays and diversions. The Gold Coast typically experiences low visibility weather conditions due to tropical storms and high rainfall during the summer months, which is the region’s peak travel season.

As it is being installed on Runway 14, use of the ILS will require a new flight path extending north in a straight line from the runway to approximately Surfers Paradise.

Construction works and flight path validation will take approximately 12 months. Aircraft are expected to start using the ILS in early 2018. Before it is available to airlines the Civil Aviation Safety Authority will require that the ILS flight path is flown by a specialist calibration aircraft.

Noise abatement procedures will ensure that alternative flight paths are used in preference to the ILS unless operationally required due to weather or other reasons. Usage will vary according to weather conditions. When the weather is fine there may be days when the ILS is not used at all. On days when the weather is poor, all aircraft may need to use the ILS. When ILS usage is averaged out over the year it is expected to average six flights per day based on forecasts in Gold Coast Airport’s Major Development Plan.

ILS flight path

The ILS will need a new flight path extending north for about 18 kilometres (10 nautical miles) in a straight line from the northern end of the main runway to approximately Surfers Paradise (see map 1). This will give aircraft enough opportunity to ‘line up’ to the runway and ‘lock in’ with the ILS to receive guidance to the runway.

Much of this flight path is over residential land instead of over the ocean where most existing arrival flight paths are located. This will also mean a longer flying distance for those aircraft arriving from the south and east of the airport. At the starting point of the ILS approach flight path, 18 kilometres from the runway, aircraft will be more than 750 metres high or 2500 feet above ground level. Aircraft will generally perform a smooth constant descent once established in a straight line with the runway.

ILS flight path

MAP 1: The ILS flight path is shown by solid yellow lines. Some aircraft may fly through the region between the dotted lines as they travel to join the ILS flight path. Click on the map to see a larger version and use your BACK button to return to this page.

For information on flight paths currently in use, visit our online information about Gold Coast Airport or WebTrak.

How will the ILS affect me?

When in use, the new ILS flight paths will have a varying effect on suburbs to the north of the airport. In the map below, suburbs have been grouped into regions to more effectively explain the aircraft noise impacts when the ILS is in use. A detailed description of the noise effects for each region appears below the map. Click on the map to see a larger version and use your BACK button to return to this page.

How noise from the ILS flight path with affect residents

MAP 2: How noise from the ILS flight path will affect residents. See description below. Click to see a larger version of the map and use your BACK button to return to this page.

Region 1 (green)

The proposed ILS flight path will be very similar to the existing approach flight paths to Runway 14 so the suburbs of Currumbin, Tugun and Bilinga are not expected to experience any additional aircraft noise impacts as a result.

Region 2 (orange)

Residents in this area, from Palm Beach to Surfers Paradise, currently experience a low level of aircraft noise. This area is expected to experience noticeable increases in aircraft noise when the ILS is used as aircraft will be travelling overhead instead of being some distance to the east over the ocean. Region 2 is expected to experience additional aircraft noise events of up to 74 dB(A) which is similar to the sound you may hear when a truck drives down your street and you are inside your home. Residents may perceive the increase in aircraft noise as up to twice as loud in some areas of Region 2.

Region 3 (solid and striped pink)

Region 3 is not expected to experience significant noise impacts as a result of the ILS. Aircraft arriving from the north using the ILS will generally fly within the solid pink coastal corridor on the map, spanning the suburbs of Runaway Bay to Surfers Paradise. Most international aircraft arriving into the Gold Coast from the north will fly over this region.

The suburbs of Varsity Lakes to Helensvale make up the striped, left portion of Region 3. A small number of aircraft could fly over this region to join the ILS flight path in order to avoid extreme weather events, to spread high volumes of air traffic or to respond to medical or aircraft emergencies.

Resources

Gold Coast ILS FAQs

How long will the ILS take to build?

The ILS will take 12-18 months from commencement of construction to approval for use by aircraft. It is anticipated that residents can expect to see aircraft flying the ILS in mid to late 2018. Before it is available to airlines the Civil Aviation Safety Authority will require that the ILS flight path be flown by a specialist calibration aircraft.

When will the ILS be used?

It is essential to remember that air traffic control are required to provide the most appropriate approach procedure available to ensure the safe landing of aircraft and in all weather conditions, pilots must be able to see the runway before landing.

The ILS will be available every day of the year to aircraft (international and domestic) arriving on Runway 14 at Gold Coast Airport, however use of this procedure will depend on a number of conditions.

The precise number of flights expected to use the ILS is difficult to predict as the decision to fly the ILS approach is made by the pilot based on a number of factors. These include weather conditions, as well as the type of landing technology used by respective airlines.

Aircraft arriving to Gold Coast Airport from the north onto Runway 14 prefer to use the satellite-based navigation procedure ‘Required Navigation Performance’ (RNP) as this approach is the most technologically advanced – with both horizontal and vertical guidance and provides the greatest safety and efficiency benefits. This approach keeps aircraft over water until Currumbin Creek.

If the aircraft is operated by an Australian or New Zealand carrier, the pilot is also permitted to request a visual approach, which follows a similar flight path to the RNP approach.

If the weather on the day is poor visual approaches may not be available, as the line of sight to the runway may be obscured by cloud. In this case, providing the cloud is high enough for the pilot to see the runway one of the satellite-based navigation procedures (RNP or Area Navigation (RNAV)) approaches will be used.

Primarily, when the weather is very poor and the cloud is low, with limited visibility it is likely that all aircraft arriving at Gold Coast airport from the north using Runway 14 will require the use of the ILS to see the runway.

The ILS may also be used if operationally required or required for emergencies such as a failure of the satellite or any equipment that prevents use of satellite-based navigation.

Will noise abatement procedures be used?

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) decision has required that noise abatement measures be drafted for implementation.

Noise Abatement Procedures will be put in place before the ILS is available to airlines to ensure that alternative flight paths will be used unless operational conditions require or as a contingency if there are no other options available to the pilot.

Noise abatement procedures will also apply to military and jet training aircraft.

Will training aircraft be allowed to use the ILS in fine weather?

Light aircraft currently carry out pilot training on instrument approaches close to the ILS flight path and overfly similar residential areas to the ILS flight path. Whilst these flights will continue to be used, Airservices may limit the schedule for, or amount of, light aircraft using the ILS. Jet aircraft training will not be permitted.

Are military aircraft permitted to use the ILS?

Military aircraft will be subject to the same Noise Abatement Procedures as other aircraft. The ILS will only be available to these aircraft when operational conditions require.


Please refer to fact sheets Instrument Landing System for Gold Coast Airport and What is an Instrument Landing System for further information.

What is an instrument landing system?

An Instrument Landing System (ILS) is a highly accurate radio signal navigation aid consisting of two antennas which transmit signals to receivers in the aircraft cockpit—a glide path tower located next to the runway at the northern end and a localiser antenna at the southern end. These antennas provide the pilot with vertical and horizontal guidance when landing in low visibility. An ILS is not used by departing aircraft.

How the localiser and glide path work together to provide vertical and horizontal guidance to pilots

How the localiser and glide path work together to provide vertical and horizontal guidance to pilots

How will an ILS improve flight reliability?

Gold Coast Airport is operating safely without an ILS and the public can continue to travel by air with confidence. An ILS enables airlines and airports to continue operations in low visibility conditions, such as rain and low cloud. This will increase the reliability of landing at the airport. In any weather conditions, pilots must be able to see the runway before landing.

Installing an ILS at Gold Coast Airport will reduce the “decision altitude” or height at which a pilot must make the decision to continue with the landing with the runway in sight or to go-around or divert because the runway is obscured by cloud. An ILS will reduce the decision height, or minima, from 430 feet to 280 feet, improving the chance of landing in poor weather. However, an ILS will not guarantee a landing in all weather—the decision to land in poor weather is ultimately up to the pilot-in-command.

What is the difference between ILS and Smart Tracking?

Smart Tracking is satellite-assisted navigation technology allowing aircraft to fly with greater accuracy and can assist in allowing an aircraft to land in low visibility conditions.

At the Gold Coast, Smart Tracking allows aircraft to approach Runway 14 from the south and north with the majority of the flight path over the water before making a final approach for landing. Smart Tracking at Gold Coast Airport has a decision altitude or minima—where the pilot must be able to see the runway to continue with the landing—of 430 feet.

In comparison, an ILS provides a minimum decision altitude of 280 feet and improves the predictability of landing in low visibility conditions.

More information

Hobart Airport - Standard Arrivals and Departures

Hobart Airspace Design Review 

15 November 2019

Following the completion of the Hobart Airspace Design Review, new flight paths for Hobart Airport arrivals and departures commenced operation on 7 November 2019.

For information on aircraft operations in your area see our Community Specific Fact Sheets.

Why did Flight Paths have to change?

Airservices Australia introduced changes to arrival and departure flight paths at Hobart Airport in September 2017. The changes were designed to organise aircraft departing from or arriving into Hobart Airport onto standard routes called Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs).

In response to negative community feedback regarding aircraft noise and visual impacts, we committed to amending the arrival flight path for Runway 30, and this was implemented in March 2018. We additionally committed to reviewing the design of the SIDs and STARs for runway 12 and runway 30 within the operational requirements and constraints at Hobart Airport.

What activities formed part of the Review?

Submissions closed on 7 January 2019.

Feedback was sought via the following

  • Online Submission form
  • Written submissions (email and post)
  • Onsite Community Consultation sessions were held in November 2018 in Bagdad, Brighton, Campania, Copping, Dunalley, Primrose Sands, Sorell, Richmond and Taranna.

How did we listen?

Following the Hobart Airspace Design Review consultation period, we carefully analysed and considered all the feedback and submissions received through a comprehensive process to develop the final flight path design. The Consultation Summary Report is a summary of feedback received through engagement activities undertaken between 31 October 2018 and 7 January 2019.

The final design was shaped by this feedback, delivering a range of safety enhancements and operational efficiencies, while minimising the effect of aircraft operations on communities and the environment, where possible.

We invite you to read the Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report, which contains the final design and how we considered feedback.

Our community engagement activities in support of the final design included on-site community updates in the Hobart area and online Q&A sessions during May 2019.


Previous updates

Hobart Airspace Design Review Community Update Program

24 May 2019

Following the release of the Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report on 29 March 2019, we have finalised the Hobart Airspace Design Review.

Implementation of the final design, and associated airspace, is planned for 7 November 2019.

CASA Approval was received for the Airspace Change Proposal on 8 May 2019.

Today we have also launched our new engagement hub, a digital platform that will support our community engagement activities. We are pleased that the Hobart Airspace Design Review is the first project to be hosted on this platform. For more information on the sessions and to participate in the Live Q&A sessions, please visit and register via https://engage.airservicesaustralia.com/

Throughout next week we will be undertaking several activities as part of the Community Update Program in support of the Final Report. Airservices staff are providing various opportunities for you to follow up on questions regarding how aircraft will operate on the new flight paths:

Community Update Activities

  • On-site community information display – hosted at the Civic Administration Centre,  Sorell Council from Monday 27 May – Friday 31 May 2019.This static display will include information on the final flight paths and seasonal aircraft movements, community specific fact sheets and information about airspace change processes. Community members are invited to visit this display and access the information at their convenience or access fact sheets from Clarence Council and Tasman Council.
  • Face to Face Information Sessions – during our Face to Face sessions, we will be able to demonstrate to you how and where aircraft will fly on the flight path, relative to your home. Meet with Airservices representatives in person at the Civic Administration Centre, Sorell Council:(External link)Thursday 30 May, 12pm to 1pmFriday 31 May, 10am to 11amFriday 31 May, 1.30pm to 2.30pmVirtual Drop In/Live Online Q&A Sessions – representatives from Airservices will be available to answer your questions regarding the new flight paths to be implemented on 7 November 2019 live at Today we have also launched our new engagement hub, a digital platform that will support our community engagement activities.We are pleased that the Hobart Airspace Design Review is the first project to be hosted on this platform.
    For more information on the sessions and to participate in the Live Q&A sessions, please visit and register via https://engage.airservicesaustralia.com/ during the following dates and times:Thursday 30 May, 10am to 11amThursday 30 May, 5pm to 6pmFriday 31 May, 12pm to 1pm

Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report

29 March 2019

Following the Hobart Airspace Design Review consultation period, we have undertaken a comprehensive process to develop the final flight path design.

We have carefully analysed and considered all the feedback and submissions received during the consultation period.

The final design has been shaped by feedback from the community, delivering a range of safety enhancements and operational efficiencies, while minimising the effect of aircraft operations on communities and the environment, wherever possible.

We invite you to read the Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report, which contains the final design and consideration of feedback.

Our community engagement activities in support of the final design will include on-site community updates in the Hobart area in May 2019, and community specific fact sheets.

Further information regarding dates and locations will be provided on the website shortly.

Thank you to all who have provided feedback during the Hobart Airspace Design Review.


26 March 2019

Airservices released the Hobart Airspace Design Review – Proposed Design Feedback Consultation Summary Report on 7 March 2019 and invited community members who provided feedback during the consultation period to review the report to ensure that their feedback was accurately reflected.

Feedback was received from 11 participants/community groups, and was considered and actioned as follows:

  • Correction: where a correction has been requested that is a matter of fact and not opinion about accuracy of analysis based on partial access to all the information, the correction has been verified against records, and acted upon accordingly to amend or not amend the report.
  • Opinion: where an opinion is expressed about accuracy of analysis based on partial access to all the information, the analysis has been checked against the data and reviewed for accuracy, and acted upon accordingly to amend or not amend the report.
  • Clarification: where clarification has been requested, the items have been reviewed and acted upon accordingly to amend or not amend the report.

Click here for the final report.

Airservices has also received feedback on the Hobart Airspace Design Review – Stakeholder Reference Panel 2 Summary Report (October 2018), which has been incorporated.

Click here for the updated report.

Airservices thanks everyone who has provided feedback on these documents.


7 March 2019

Airservices conducted consultation on the proposed Hobart Airspace Designs between 31 October 2018 and 21 December 2018, with written submissions received until 7 January 2019.

This included consultation with community, and industry stakeholders (including airlines, airports and general aviation operators). The industry feedback has been consolidated into the Industry Consultation Feedback Summary.


28 February 2019

Airservices conducted consultation on the proposed Hobart Airspace Design between 31 October 2018 and 21 December 2018, with written submissions received until 7 January 2019.

A total of 277 submissions and responses were received from community members during this period. Verbal and written feedback was also received during 15 on-site consultation sessions held in the Hobart area (between 15 and 21 November 2018).

These community submissions, responses and feedback have been consolidated into the Hobart Airspace Design Review – Proposed Design Feedback Consultation Summary Report.

Community members who provided feedback during the consultation period are invited to review the report to ensure that their feedback has been accurately reflected. Please note that consultation on the proposed designs closed on 7 January 2019 and that, in the interests of transparency and fairness, additional or further feedback cannot be accepted.

Comments on the report can be provided until 11 March 2019 to Tania Parkes Consulting via email or telephone:

Consultation was also undertaken during this period with other stakeholders, including airlines, operators and other industry representatives.  A summary of the other stakeholder feedback will be provided on the website on 7 March 2019, including the release of the Stakeholder Reference Panel #2 Summary Report.

Airservices is currently conducting an analysis of all of the stakeholder feedback and will provide a report on how this feedback has been considered in the development of the final Hobart Airspace Design. The Consideration of Feedback report will be released in late March 2019.


17 January 2019

During the Hobart Airspace Design Review Community Consultation period Airservices received feedback regarding the airspace design development process.

In response to this feedback, Airservices has produced a Design Development Process Fact Sheet. This fact sheet provides an overview of the process.

We have received a number of submissions and responses, and will be consolidating them into the Proposed Flight Path Design Consultation Summary Report, due in February 2019.

The Timeline below has been updated with quicklinks to reports and documents.


11 January 2019

The Community Consultation period for the Hobart Airspace Design Review closed on Friday 21 December 2018, and the extended period for written feedback submissions closed on Monday 7 January 2019.

We would like to thank all stakeholders for their feedback.

We have received a number of submissions and responses, and will be consolidating them into the Proposed Flight Path Design Consultation Summary Report, due in February 2019.


18 December 2018

The Community Consultation period for the Hobart Airspace Design closes on Friday 21 December 2018.

Please note that within the period from 22 December 2018 to 7 January 2019 we will be unable to respond to feedback and questions.

During the consultation period feedback may continue to be submitted via:

Airservices Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS)

Tania Parkes Consulting


21 November 2018

The Community Consultation period for the Hobart Airspace Design Review has been extended until 21 December 2018.

Please provide feedback via:

Airservices Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS)

Tania Parkes Consulting

Hobart Airspace Proposed Flight Plan Designs Released


8 November 2018

The proposed flight path designs are described in the Updated Proposed Flight Path Designs Fact Sheet (November 2018). The updated Fact Sheet reflects feedback provided by the community, and contains updated and additional maps, supported by additional explanatory text. We acknowledge that the original version uploaded on 31 October included material that required correction.

image

Hobart Airspace Design Review – Proposed Flight Path Designs


16 November 2018

Community Consultation sessions have commenced for the Airservices Hobart Airspace Design Review. An additional session is now available in Dunalley (Tuesday, 20 November, 12pm-2pm). Details of session times and locations can be viewed in the updated Consultation Schedule.


9 November 2018

Updated November Consultation Schedule

consultation-dates-updated-image

Airservices will be conducting on-site consultation in the broader Hobart Area from the 15 to 21 November 2018. Details of the locations and times of consultations are available for download here.


31 October 2018

Airservices has undertaken a review of the Hobart Airport SIDs and STARs for Runway 12 and Runway 30, using a ‘greenfield approach’, with safety of air navigation as our primary consideration.

While the current flight path design is safe, Airservices has identified opportunities to improve safety while minimising the effect of aircraft noise on the community, where possible.

The proposed flight path designs are described in the Proposed Flight Path Designs Fact Sheet.

Prior to the on-site consultation sessions in Hobart, to be held between 15 and 21 November 2018, Airservices will produce information for a range of communities that will provide additional information including:

  • What will I see?
  • What will I hear?
  • Where will aircraft fly?
  • How many aircraft will fly over my area?
  • How will it be different from what I experience today?

This material will be available on our website from Friday 9 November 2018.

We will be available to discuss this material in more detail at the on-site consultations.

You can provide feedback here:

  • Airservices Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS)
  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
  • interpreter-symbol-2

Community Engagement Plan Released

28 September 2018

On 4 September 2018, Airservices released the draft Community Engagement Plan prepared by Tania Parkes Consulting, with an online survey to enable the community to provide feedback on the plan.

Airservices thanks all residents who provided feedback. A Community Engagement Plan Survey Results summary is provided.

Some residents suggested additional methods for notification of consultation sessions, including the use of text messaging, local radio and community roadside notice boards, and these have been incorporated into the plan.

Community consultation activities for the Hobart Airspace Design review are provided in the final Community Engagement Plan.


Stakeholder Reference Panel
21 September 2018

On 14 September 2018, Airservices convened a Stakeholder Reference Panel as part of the Hobart Airspace Design Review consultation activities.

The Stakeholder Reference Panel was chaired by a stakeholder engagement specialist, Dr Tania Parkes, and consisted of representatives from Clarence, Sorrel and Tasman local councils, state government, Tourism Tasmania, Hobart International Airport, Airlines, and community advocates from the Hobart Community Aviation Consultation Group, South East Coast Lifestyle Association and the Dunalley Neighbourhood House.

The Stakeholder Reference Panel is an internationally recognised best practice model used to engage a diverse range of stakeholders on change and is being incorporated into consultation activities across a range of sectors such as transportation, utilities and mining.

The aim of the Panel was to share and discuss the range of industry and community stakeholder considerations gathered to date from various consultation activities. The Panel was briefed on a number of flight path design constraints, including international and domestic regulatory requirements, operational requirements for aircraft, and the considerations nominated by industry and community stakeholders during recent consultations. Some additional considerations were presented by Panel participants and these will further inform our flight path design activity.

Flight Path Design Considerations
Summary download

Flight Path Design Considerations Summary PDF link

The participation of key stakeholders in the Stakeholder Reference Panel is an important milestone for Airservices and the work being undertaken in Hobart. We thank everyone for their genuine engagement, thoughtful comments and feedback, and the collective goodwill to progress the upcoming community consultation in a meaningful way.

The proposed flight path designs are being informed by the constraints and considerations mentioned above, and will be available on our website from 31 October 2018. Opportunities to provide feedback on the proposed flight path designs will be available until 27 November 2018, including face-to-face engagement in Hobart from 15 to 21 November 2018.

Airservices will consider the feedback received from industry, government and communities before making a decision on the final flight paths that reflect our legislative responsibility of providing safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally-responsible air navigation services to the industry and the travelling public.


4 September 2018

To inform the Hobart Airspace Design Review, on 14 and 15 June 2018 Airservices undertook initial community consultation in Hobart to establish a plan for community engagement and document social impacts of the Hobart flight path changes.

This consultation activity has produced two documents: Social Impact of Hobart Airspace Changes (September 2017/March 2018) Consultation Summary Report (August 2018) and draft Community Engagement Plan (August 2018), prepared by Tania Parkes Consulting for Airservices.

Community Engagement Plan
Feedback is sought on the draft Community Engagement Plan via an online survey

The survey is anonymous and can only be completed once per person.

The survey will be open from 4 September – 18 September 2018.

The finalised Community Engagement Plan will be provided on the Airservices website on 28 September 2018.

The draft Community Engagement Plan has informed the development of Airservices stakeholder engagement activities.  Please see below for community consultation and feedback key dates.

Stakeholder Reference Panel
To commence the next stage of stakeholder engagement and consultation in Hobart, and in accordance with the draft Community Engagement Plan, Airservices will host a Stakeholder Reference Panel to meet in advance of the broader community consultations for a day of facilitated discussion and consultation.

Representation is by invitation to ensure key stakeholders and community advocates are provided with an opportunity to better understand the regulatory, technical, operational, and community considerations for Airservices’ flight plan designs, and to enable the sharing of a range stakeholder views in a small group format.


17 August 2018

It was originally envisaged that proposed flight path designs would be ready for community consultation in August 2018 but they will not be ready now until October 2018. This work is technical and complex and is taking longer than anticipated but it is important that we get it right.

Airservices received a large number of responses from the community following the consultation in June 2018. We are still working through the statements and views provided by the community, and hope to publish these within the next two weeks.

With safety as our primary consideration, the Hobart Airspace Design Review is considering design options starting from a ‘blank sheet of paper’ which will be informed by the feedback from the community, industry and government stakeholders within the constraints of our operational and regulatory requirements.

We expect to provide an update which will include the community Consultation Summary Report, draft Community Engagement Plan for feedback via an online survey and proposed consultation periods within the next two weeks.  Following consideration of this feedback,  we are planning to commence community consultation in October 2018 on proposed designs. Consultation dates will avoid the Spring School Holiday period.

If you have any questions or require further information, please contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service on 1800 802 584 or https://complaints.bksv.com/asa.


4 July 2018

Hobart Airspace Design Review – Upcoming Consultations 

On 14-15 June 2018 we undertook consultation to inform the Hobart Airspace Design Review. 

Airservices retained a community engagement specialist and social planner to identify social impacts to inform the Airspace Design Review and to assist in designing a Community Engagement Plan that will be used as the basis for consultation with a broader demographic in August 2018 when Airservices presents the initial findings of the Airspace Design Review. 

The consultations provided opportunity for stakeholders and community members to participate in the co-design of the Community Engagement Plan and to meet community engagement specialist and social planner Tania Parkes.

Thank you to those who either attended the consultations or provided information following the consultations. 

A copy of the information sheet provided at the consultations is available on this webpage (under Downloads). 

The Draft Community Engagement Plan will be available shortly.  Once the Engagement Plan is finalised, Airservices will provide further information on the consultations for the initial findings of the Airspace Design Review. 


1 June 2018

Hobart Airspace Design Review – upcoming consultations

We are progressing consultation with stakeholders to inform the Hobart Airspace Design Review.

Airservices has retained a community engagement specialist and social planner Tania Parkes to identify social impacts to inform the Airspace Design Review and to assist in designing a Community Engagement Plan that will be used as the basis for consultation with a broader demographic in August 2018 when Airservices presents the initial findings of the Airspace Design Review. 

Stakeholders and community members are invited to attend the consultations listed below to participate in the co-design of the Community Engagement Plan and to meet community engagement specialist and social planner Tania Parkes.

Thursday 14 June 2018
9am and 10am consultations: Primrose Sands Community Centre, 570 Primrose Sands Rd, Primrose Sands
12pm and 1pm consultations: Sorell Memorial Hall, Cole St, Sorell
6pm and 7pm consultations: Dunalley Community Hall, 5 Franklin St, Dunalley

Friday 15 June 2018
12pm and 1pm consultations: Dunalley Community Hall, 5 Franklin St, Dunalley
6pm and 8pm consultations: Sorell Memorial Hall, Cole St, Sorell


27 April 2018

The Aircraft Noise Ombudsman (ANO) has released the report Investigation into complaints about the introduction of new flight paths in Hobart April 2018. Airservices response can also be found at the end of the report.


26 April 2018

As part of a proactive approach to managing issues associated with implementing flight path changes, Airservices has completed an internal review into its processes associated with aircraft noise management. This internal process review was conducted to provide an assessment of performance against key policy and procedural documents and provide recommendations for improvement. This review identified 29 actions, all of which were implemented by the end of March 2018. The report Review into processes associated with aircraft noise management will form part of Airservices commitment to continuous improvement and inform the management of the introduction of flight path changes into the future.


24 April 2018

Stakeholder consultation to support the Hobart Airspace Design Review, of the Hobart Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs) and Standard Instrument Departure routes (SIDs) will commence with initial discussions in late May, early June 2018. This first phase of consultation will allow all stakeholders to understand and provide input into the consultation process and establish the most appropriate format for engagement during 2018. A second round of consultation will be held to present a draft engagement plan developed from discussions during the initial consultation phase.

A third consultation round is planned for August 2018 where in depth engagement will follow the presentation of initial findings of the technical review of flight path options. Details of the arrangements for the first phase of consultation will be available here shortly.


28 February 2018

Airservices introduced changes to arrival and departure routes at Hobart Airport on 14 September 2017. Following consideration of concerns raised by the community regarding changes to the arrival flight path to Runway 30, Airservices conducted a review to identify and assess possible safe and feasible alternatives flight paths.

The report of the review, Review Report Hobart Runway 30 STAR, November 2017, concluded that Airservices will implement the ‘Alternative 2’ flight path.

‘Alternative 2’, arrival path as shown in the review report, will become effective on 1 March 2018. This new flight path will provide an improved noise outcome for some areas that are currently affected by aircraft noise.


31 January 2018

Airservices introduced changes to arrival and departure flight paths at Hobart Airport on 14th September 2017. The changes were designed to organise aircraft departing from, or arriving into, Hobart Airport onto standard routes called Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs). Airservices committed to a further review of the Hobart SIDs and STARs. Access the Terms of Reference (below) for the review.


24 November 2017

Airservices has carefully considered the concerns raised in community feedback about the flight path changes implemented on 14 September 2017. A review identified a number of alternative flight paths. A report on why the changes were made, alternative flight paths considered, community feedback and Airservices decision are outlined in Review Report Hobart Runway 30 STAR.


22 November 2017

At today’s Community Aviation Consultative Group meeting at Hobart Airport, it was announced that following a review of changes made to flight paths at Hobart Airport, that Airservices intends to implement Alternative Flight Path 2 based on safety, air traffic management and community feedback. This implementation is planned to be completed in March 2018, due to the requirement to publish the procedure in aeronautical documentation and provide airlines with sufficient time to program flight management systems. A full report of the review will be made available on the Airservices website by the end of this week.

Airservices will now undertake a further review of the Hobart Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs) and Standard Instrument Departure routes (SIDs) with terms of reference to be published by the end of January 2018. Airservices is committed to consulting with the community and other stakeholders throughout the review process. It is anticipated that the review will take approximately 12–18 months to complete.


10 November 2017

Information about:

  • the alternative flight paths identified as part of the review
  • the review process, and
  • how to provide feedback on the alternatives that have been identified

is now available on our Review of arrival flight path to Hobart Airport page.


8 November 2017

Extended hours for consultation drop-in session

In response to requests we are extending the hours of the community consultation drop-in session on 11 November 2017 at Dunalley House, 172 Arthur Highway, Dunalley.

The session will now run from 11.15am until 3pm. You are welcome to attend at any time between these hours.

On arrival small groups of up to 10 people at a time will be given an introduction of around 15 minutes by Manager Southern Operations, Steve Clarke. These introductions will run consecutively throughout the session.

After the introduction three specialists will be on hand to discuss issues and answer questions in more depth with individuals and small groups.

As the venue size is limited, it would be greatly appreciated if you would register your intention to attend and include an indication of what time you may arrive. We will use this information to limit any waiting times as far as possible. Please register by calling the NCIS on 1800 802 584 or by using our online form.


3 November 2017

As part of our review of the arrival flight path over Kellevie, Copping, Dunalley and Boomer Bay, Airservices is seeking feedback from the community on safe and feasible flight path alternatives that may reduce the impact of aircraft noise over these areas.

A community consultation drop-in session will be held on 11 November 2017 at Dunalley House, 172 Arthur Highway Dunalley between 11.15am and 3pm and you are welcome to attend at any time between these hours.

If you are available to attend, we encourage you to register by calling the NCIS on 1800 802 584 or by indicating your intention to attend using our online form.


20 October 2017

Airservices have carefully considered the concerns raised in community feedback about the flight path changes implemented on 14 September 2017. A review has commenced to assess and identify possible safe and feasible alternatives that would reduce aircraft noise impact on residents. In assessing possible options, safety will be our highest priority while seeking every opportunity to minimise and where possible reduce the impact of aircraft noise. The review will take several weeks and we will provide updates here regarding expected timelines.

Feedback can continue to be submitted to the Noise Complaints and Information Service.


19 October 2017

When designing these new flight paths, Airservices conducted an environmental assessment in accordance with Commonwealth regulatory requirements and Airservices environmental standards and procedures. The report Environmental Assessment of Hobart Airport – Proposed SIDs & STARS June 2017 is available below.


Timeline

1 February 2019

You can now access documents and reports through the interactive Timeline:

Community Specific Fact Sheets

Hobart Airspace Community Specific Fact Sheets

9 November 2018

Airservices has prepared Fact Sheets for specific communities located within areas affected by proposed flight path designs.

The Community Specific Fact Sheets are available below.

Bagdad
Boomer Bay
Bream Creek
Bridgewater
Campania
Carlton
Connellys Marsh
Copping
Dodges Ferry
Dunalley
Forcett
Kellevie
Marion Bay
Murdunna
Primrose Sands
Richmond
Sloping Main
Smooth Island
Sorell

Airservices will be available to discuss this material in more detail at the on-site consultations to be held between 15 and 21 November 2018.


Community Engagement Activities

Airservices is pleased to have engaged Tania Parkes Consulting to assist in this next phase of community consultation and engagement.

Specific details of Community Engagement activities are provided in the table below:

Community Engagement and Consultation Activities Key Dates
Social Impact of Hobart Airspace Changes (September 2017/March 2018) Consultation Summary Report (August 2018) released 4 September 2018
Draft Community Engagement Plan (August 2018) released 4 September 2018
Community consultation and feedback on draft Community Engagement Plan opens 4 September 2018
Stakeholder Reference Panel, Hobart 14 September 2018
Community consultation and feedback on draft Community Engagement Plan closes 18 September 2018
Finalised Community Engagement Plan (September 2018) released 28 September 2018
Proposed Flight Path Designs released 31 October 2018
Community consultation and feedback period opens 31 October 2018
Community onsite consultation sessions – Hobart 15-21 November 2018
Community consultation feedback period closes 21 December 2018
Written feedback submissions close 7 January 2019
Proposed Flight Path Designs Consultation Summary Report released February 2019*
Hobart Airspace Design Review Consideration of Feedback released March 2019*
Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report released March 2019*

*Due to the extension of the community consultation period to 21 December 2018, these dates are currently under review. Please refer to the Hobart Airspace Design Review Timeline (December 2018).

Details of change

Airservices introduced flight path changes at Hobart Airport on 14 September 2017. These changes were made to organise aircraft movements onto standard routes, as previously, each aircraft was given an individual heading by air traffic control. As traffic volumes continue to increase it becomes more complex for air traffic controllers to deal with each aircraft individually in this way.

Airservices carefully considered concerns raised through community feedback about the flight path changes implemented on 14 September 2017 and conducted a review of alternative flight paths. A report outlining why the changes were made, alternative flight paths considered and community feedback are contained in Review Report Hobart Runway 30 STAR.

Airservices is now undertaking a further review, Hobart Airspace Design Review, of the Hobart Standard Instrument Arrival (STARs) and Standard Instrument Departure (SIDs). Terms of Reference for the review can be found below. Airservices is committed to consulting with the community and other stakeholders throughout the review process. It is anticipated that the review will take approximately 12–18 months to complete.

14 September 2017
Airservices implemented standard arrival and departure flight paths at Hobart Airport from 14 September 2017.

Changes to flight paths are made for a variety of reasons, including for safety and efficiency improvements. Changes at Hobart were implemented to assist air traffic control with separation standards thus reducing complexity and workload for controllers and pilots. As traffic levels increases, the standardisation of flight paths is a key safety measure which reduces complexity for pilots and air traffic controllers. These changes build separation standards into the airspace design for departing and arriving aircraft and enable pilots to improve fuel management and reduce emissions with the use on board systems.

In 2017, on average, there are around 30 arrivals and 30 departures each day at Hobart Airport. The flight paths that are used on any given day depend on which runway is in use. The runway direction used depends on the wind and other factors, with Runway 30 tending to be used more than 50 per cent of the time. For the changes shown in the maps residents will experience aircraft movements depending on direction of the wind and runway in use. Some residents will notice a change in where departing and arriving aircraft are tracking, as aircraft track with greater consistency. The maps and images below show the changes to where aircraft will be tracking.

1 March 2018
Airservices introduced changes to arrival and departure routes at Hobart Airport on 14 September 2017. Following consideration of concerns raised by the community regarding changes to the arrival flight path to Runway 30, Airservices conducted a review to identify and assess possible safe and feasible alternatives flight paths.

The report of the review, Review Report Hobart Runway 30 STAR, November 2017, concluded that Airservices will implement the ‘Alternative 2’ flight path.

‘Alternative 2’, arrival path as shown in the review report, will become effective on 1 March 2018. This new flight path will provide an improved noise outcome for some areas that are currently affected by aircraft noise.

Operational requirements and constraints

Given Airservices requirements to consider safety as the most important consideration and the regulatory requirements to utilise satellite based navigation, Standard Instrument Departures and Standard Instrument Arrivals must continue to be utilised at Hobart Airport to ensure the travelling public continue to receive the best level of air traffic control service with the safest outcomes.

The following requirements exist when considering flight path options that must be adhered to:

  • Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs) enhance safety by systemising air routes so that arriving and departing aircraft are segregated and ensuring consistency and predictability of arrival movements using the latest available satellite based navigation technology and standards
  • Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs) provide terrain clearance, improve approach stability and environmental outcomes
  • The flight path must be designed to international safety standards that have been adopted for Australia by the airspace regulator, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority
  • Flight paths must accommodate aircraft arriving from, and departing to, airports in a number of directions
  • Flight paths must be contained within air traffic control sectors and minimise complexity within each sector
  • Airspace and flight paths must be designed to facilitate safe descent and climb
  • The flight paths must remain inside designated controlled airspace
  • Arrival flight paths must connect air routes to instrument landing procedures which provide guidance to the runway e.g. area navigation (RNAV) and instrument landing system (ILS)
  • Airspace design must allow application of air traffic control procedures and standards
  • Flight paths must allow for the efficient sequencing and management of aircraft in the broader network by air traffic control, and minimise fuel burn and emissions as much as possible

Flight paths must also allow the efficient sequencing and management of aircraft in the broader network by air traffic control, and minimise fuel burn and emissions as much as possible.

Terms of reference

Within the operational requirements and constraints at Hobart Airport, Airservices will review the design of the SIDs and STARs for runway 12 and runway 30 in accordance with the following terms of reference:

The Hobart Airspace Design Review will be undertaken as a greenfield approach with the safety of air navigation as the primary consideration and will include:

  • An assessment of the operability of the design implemented on 14 September 2017, also including the planned change to the runway 30 STAR for implementation in March 2018
  • Recommendations for any changes that would enhance the safety of the design balanced with minimising the effects of aircraft noise on the community as far as practicable
  • The requirements list in the section Operational requirements and constraints

Any proposed changes to the airspace design must consider:

  • Regulatory requirements
  • Efficiency of aircraft operation and airport capacity constraints
  • Airspace operating constraints including aircraft capability, controlled airspace design, pilot work load, air traffic control system capability, and air traffic control standards and procedures

A report will be prepared detailing the outcomes of the review including:

  • Findings and recommendations
  • Airline customer feedback
  • Outcomes of other stakeholder feedback including community

Maps

14 September 2017

Departures from Runway 12

departuresr12

Residents of Primrose Sands are not likely to be directly overflown however they may notice changes to the tracking of departing aircraft and an increase in the consistency of this tracking.
Residents in the Connellys Marsh area are currently overflown, however they may notice changes to the tracking of departing aircraft and an increase in the consistency of this tracking. Aircraft are at approximately 8000 to 9000 feet in altitude. Noise levels over 60 decibels are possible for larger aircraft.

Arrivals to Runway 12

arrivalsr12

New flight path show in yellow for aircraft arriving to Runway 12 from the north. No change to existing flight path shown in red (instrument approach).

Departures from Runway 30

departuresr30

Residents in the Campania area are currently overflown, however they may notice changes to the tracking of departing aircraft and an increase in the consistency of this tracking. Aircraft will be at altitudes of approximately 4000 to 5200 feet over this area.

Arrivals to Runway 30

arivalsr30

New flight path show in yellow for aircraft arriving to Runway 30 from the north. No change to existing flight path shown in red (instrument approach).
Residents in the Dunalley and Copping will notice changes to the tracking of arriving aircraft and an increase in the consistency of this tracking. Aircraft are expected to be at altitudes of approximately 5000 to 6000 feet over these areas.

Downloads

Fact Sheets

Overview Fact Sheets

Community Specific Fact Sheets

Timelines

Reports

ANO Reports (including Airservices responses)

Jandakot Airport - Changes to Arrival and Departure Procedures

Airservices implemented these changes in October 2019.


5 July 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices will implement changes to arrival and departure procedures for aircraft using Jandakot Airport’s cross runway (Runway 12/30) from September 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Jandakot Airport is extending Runway 12/30 by 510 metres to the south-east.

These procedure changes are required to accommodate the runway extension and are consistent with information provided in the Major Development Plan (MDP) which was developed by Jandakot Airport (JAH) and consulted on with the community from December 2015 to March 2016.

This MDP was approved by the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport in June 2016.

 What is going to change?

Jandakot Airport is mainly used for training purposes and 95% of aircraft operate under visual flight rules (VFR). The remaining 5% operate under instrument flight rules (IFR).

As a result of the extension there will be several minor changes to approach and departure procedures for both VFR and IFR aircraft using Runway 30 (to the north-west).

These changes will result in noticeable visual changes to where some aircraft fly. Some of the changes will also result in small increases in noise; however as these changes are under 3 decibels (dB(A)) they are not considered to be noticeable to human hearing and residents are unlikely to notice this increase.

For more information on the changes please see the Changes to arrival and departure procedures at Jandakot Airport Fact Sheet under Resources.

There will be no changes to approach and departure procedures for Runway 12 (to the south-east).

The overall number or type of aircraft will not change as a result of the procedure changes outlined above. However, the extension will accommodate larger aircraft (e.g. Beechcraft Kingair B200) and as a result there will be a change in the type and number of aircraft using Runway 12/30, which may be noticeable to communities surrounding the airport.

Further detail about predicted movement numbers and aircraft types can be found in the Jandakot Airport Major Development Plan – Extension of Runway 12/30 and Taxiway System webpage.

It is expected that the Runway 30 circuit area will shift slightly (by up to 510m) to the southeast as a result of the Runway 12/30 runway extension. Other runway circuit patterns will not be affected.

Jandakot Airport has a Fly Neighbourly Policy to reduce the effect of aircraft noise on surrounding communities.

The Fly Neighbourly Policy is not expected to change as a result of the changes.

Resources

Changes to arrival and departure procedures at Jandakot Airport Fact Sheet (July 2019)

Kununurra Airport - Changes to Arrival Procedures

7 January 2019

The change proceeded to implementation in December 2019.


10 July 2019

Changes to arrival procedures at Kununurra Airport

When will this change occur?

Airservices will changes for aircraft arriving to Runway 12/30 at Kununurra Airport from 12 September 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is technology available on most modern aircraft, as it uses either Global Positioning System (GPS) or the barometric pressure readings from on-board equipment, to provide vertical guidance for the approach.

It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

Some of these locations, including Kununurra require changes to their existing approach procedures in order for Baro-VNAV to be introduced.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Kununurra Airport Changes to Approach Procedures under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For Queries regarding information contact Community Engagement:

For matters relating to current aircraft operations, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)

interpreter-symbol-2

Resources

Fact Sheet – Kununurra Airport Changes to Approach Procedures (July 2019)

Melbourne Airport - Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes

19 February 2020

Since 1 November 2019 approximately 10.98% (or 2,766 aircraft arrivals) of arrivals to Melbourne Airport have used the mode (up to and including 22 January 2020). The majority of these have been jet aircraft arrivals (2,498), with some turboprop arrivals (268).

As the new mode and flight path changes are designed for use during certain weather conditions, communities can expect to continue to see increased use of the mode and flight paths during warmer months, mainly in the afternoons and evenings.

More information on the change, including community specific fact sheets and infographic posters, are available below under the resources section.

22 March 2019

Feedback has now closed. For a summary of the feedback received on this change please see Summary of Feedback – Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes under Resources.

The proposal will proceed to implementation on 20 June 2019.


28 February 2019

Fact Sheets have been updated to clarify domestic and international aircraft usage of the proposed new runway mode.


25 February 2019

Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes

Airservices is proposing changes to how some runways (Runway 09 and Runway 16) are used for arrivals to Melbourne Airport, when certain wind conditions exist.

This is an Airservices initiated change to improve safety and efficiency at Melbourne Airport and is not part of the Melbourne Airport Runway Development Program.

Previous information identified that residents of Wollert may notice an increase in flights on existing flight paths when Runway 09 is in use. Further analysis of the proposed flight paths has revealed that this is not expected to be the case.

When will this change occur?

Implementation of the proposed change is planned for June 2019 (previously May 2019).

Why are the changes necessary?

The proposed changes will reduce delays to aircraft and passengers, and reduce the workload for air traffic controllers and pilots, particularly when there is holding in the air for arriving traffic into Melbourne. The proposed changes will improve safety and efficiency of operations at Melbourne Airport.

What is going to change?

Flights land and take off from different runways depending on wind, weather, operational requirements, emergencies and noise management.

Currently at Melbourne Airport, during periods of south/south easterly winds, the north-south runway (Runway 16) is used for both arrivals and departures. This is an example of what is called a runway ‘mode’. Runway modes are described in the Noise Abatement Procedures (NAPs) for Melbourne Airport.

During busy periods at Melbourne Airport, this existing runway mode may result in delays to flights on the ground and in the air, which can have flow-on impacts across the whole air traffic network.

Airservices is proposing to add a new runway mode to the NAPs to be used when there are south/south easterly winds.

In order for aircraft to land safely and efficiently on Runway 09, Airservices will also need to change some arrival flight paths to the north and northwest of Melbourne Airport. This will ensure that arriving aircraft remain separated from departing aircraft and can approach the airport in an efficient manner. These changes have been designed to be as close to existing flight paths as possible.

Existing runway modes and flight paths will continue to be used at Melbourne Airport, in other wind conditions.

The proposed new runway mode, with Runway 09 for arrivals, will not be used between 11:00pm-6:00am. However Runway 09 may be used during these times when it is the only suitable runway for operational reasons.

Where can I get more information?

For more information please see the Resources section below.

Airservices will be hosting ‘drop in’ consultation sessions with potentially affected communities between 7 and 9 March 2019:

Thursday 7 March 2019, 12:00pm to 6:00pm
Meeting Room 3
Hume Global Learning Centre – Craigieburn
75-95 Central Park Avenue, Craigieburn

Friday 8 March 2019, 12:00pm to 6:00pm
Gisborne Community Centre
Hamilton St, Gisborne

Saturday 9 March 2019, 11:00am to 3:00pm
Richards Training Room, Level 1
Melton Library and Learning Hub
31 McKenzie Street, Melton

HOW CAN I HAVE MY SAY?

Feedback can be provided:

  • In person at one of our consultation sessions
  • Via online form at: https://feedback.emsbk.com/asa
  • Mail to: Feedback c/o Noise Complaints and Information Service, PO BOX 211 Mascot NSW 1460

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
  • interpreter-symbol-2

Consultation commenced on 15 January 2019. The feedback period has been extended and now closes on 12 March 2019 (previously 26 February 2019).

Previous Updates

15 January 2018

Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes

Airservices proposes to implement a mode change to the Melbourne Airport Noise Abatement Procedures (NAPs) in April 2019.

The proposed changes will ensure that airborne and ground delays are minimised during peak periods, by implementing a new mode of operation. This new mode will allow arriving aircraft to land on the east-west runway (Runway 09) and departing aircraft to track south on the north-south runway (Runway 16).

This new mode will be used when there are south or south easterly winds, especially during summer months.

The new mode will also require changes to flight paths so that Runway 09 can be used for arrivals.

For more information please see the Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes Fact Sheet under Resources.

Airservices will conduct on-site consultation sessions with affected communities in February.
Details of these sessions will be available soon.

Prior to the on-site consultation sessions, we will publish community specific fact sheets.

Feedback closes on 26 February 2019.

Resources

Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes – Summary of Feedback (March 2019)

Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes – Poster Set – March 2019

Fact Sheet – Melbourne RWY0916 Northern Community Specific (February 2019, updated)

– Melbourne RWY0916 Western Community Specific Fact Sheet (February 2019, updated)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne RWY0916 NorthWestern Community Specific (February 2019, updated)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne RWY0916 Northern Community Specific (February 2019)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne RWY0916 Western Community Specific (February 2019)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne RWY0916 NorthWestern Community Specific (February 2019)

Melbourne RWY0916 Community Info Sessions (February 2019)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes (March 2019)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes (February 2019 updated)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes (February 2019)

Fact Sheet – Melbourne Airport Runway Mode and Flight Path Changes (15 January 2019)

Merimbula Airport - Airspace Change

Proposed changes to approach procedures at Merimbula Airport

14 June 2019

Feedback has now closed. No community feedback was received on the proposal. The flight path change will proceed to implementation in August 2019.

For a summary of the activities undertaken for this change please see Merimbula Airport Summary of Feedback – June 2019 under resources.


18 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices is proposing changes to approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Merimbula Airport from August 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires a number of changes to existing arrival procedures at Merimbula Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures at Merimbula Airport (April 2019) under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)

Feedback can be provided:

Feedback closes on 30 May 2019.

Resources

Merimbula Airport Summary of Feedback – June 2019

Fact Sheet – Changes to approach procedures at Merimbula Airport (April 2019)

Olympic Dam Airport - Changes to Approach Procedures

Changes to approach procedures at Olympic Dam Airport

Airservices implemented these changes in October 2019.


30 April 2019

When will this change occur?

Airservices will make changes to some approach procedures for aircraft arriving to Olympic Dam Airport from August 2019.

Why are the changes necessary?

Since 2007, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has encouraged its members to implement approach procedures with vertical (straight up and down) guidance to improve safety for aircraft arriving to and landing at airports.

One way to do this is to make it possible for aircraft to use Baro-VNAV technology.

Baro-VNAV is a technology available on most modern aircraft. It allows aircraft to land more smoothly, without using ground based navigation equipment. It also reduces the workload for pilots and decreases their reliance on visual assessments, making landing safer.

The introduction of Baro-NAV technology requires minor changes to existing arrival procedures at Olympic Dam Airport.

What is going to change?

For more information on the changes please see the Fact Sheet – Olympic Dam Changes to Approach Procedures (April 2019) under Resources.

How can I get more information?

For general information on flight path changes, contact the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS) on:

  • 1800 802 584 (free call)
  • 131 450 (interpreter service)
  • interpreter-symbol-2

General feedback can be provided:

Resources

Fact Sheet – Olympic Dam Changes to Approach Procedures (April 2019)

Townsville Airport - Implementation of SIDS and STARS

18 December 2018

Airservices conducted community consultation on the proposed implementation of Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs) at Townsville Airport between 26 October 2018 and 7 December 2018.

No community feedback was received on the proposal.

The proposal will proceed to implementation on 23 May 2019.

Please refer to the fact sheet Townsville Airport Implementation of SIDS and STARS for more information on this change.

Previous updates

23 November 2018

Airservices conducted community consultation on the proposed changes to the satellite-based area navigation approach (RNAV) for Runway 01 at Townsville between 5 October 2018 and 30 October 2018.

No community feedback was received on the proposed change.

Airservices implemented this change on the 8 November 2018.

Please refer to the fact sheet Townsville Traffic Management Plan RWY 01 RNAV for more information on this change.

26 October 2018
Townsville Airport Traffic Management Plan – Final Stage Implementation of SIDs and STARs

Airservices and the Department of Defence are implementing changes to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft operations for arriving and departing flights at Townsville Airport.

Since May 2017 this has included high altitude flight path changes, changes to traffic management procedures, and re-aligning the satellite-based area navigation approach (RNAV) to Runway 19 for aircraft landing at the airport when approaching from the north.

The final stage of the Traffic Management Plan provides predictable and segregated flight paths that connect aircraft from the airport to and from high level routes. This component is the proposed implementation of Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs).

For more information please refer to the fact sheet Townsville Airport Implementation of SIDS and STARS

For more information on the Runway 01 RNAV approaches for Townsville Airport please refer to the fact sheet Townsville Traffic Management Plan RWY 01 RNAV

5 October 2018
Townsville Airport Traffic Management Plan – Final Stage Runway 01 RNAV approaches May 2017

Airservices and the Department of Defence are implementing changes to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft operations for arriving and departing flights at Townsville Airport.

These changes will ensure aircraft flying in and out of Townsville airport are on more predictable and segregated flight paths that can be better managed by aircraft flight management systems, and reducing pilot and air traffic control workload.

Since May 2017 this has included high level flight path changes, changes to traffic management procedures and realigning the satellite-based area navigation approach (RNAV) to Runway 19, for aircraft landing at the airport when approaching from the north.

The satellite-based area navigation approach to Runway 01, for aircraft landing at the airport when approaching from the south, is now going to be updated to utilise the latest navigation technology.

For more information please see the Townsville Traffic Management Plan RWY 01 RNAV factsheet under Downloads.

May 2017
Airservices and RAAF Townsville are realigning the satellite based navigation approach to Runway 19 to improve safety and improve the landing capability of aircraft. The new flight path will move approximately 2km west of Horseshoe Bay residential area and reduce overall noise impacts relative to the existing flight path.

There are a small number of residents located to the west of Horseshoe Bay who may notice an increase in noise levels and a change in aircraft tracking.

Downloads

Downloads